Farmers & Hunting

Farmers & Hunting

• The inhospitable conditions in many wild animals’ home ranges are generally as a result of farmers and other hunters (including youths) who often drive around and shoot wildlife at will, or trap and poison wildlife, often killing untargeted species in the process.
• The Western Cape Hunting Notice allows hunters to:
• Kill two monkeys every day, all year round
• Two baboons every day, all year round
• Ten caracal every day, all year round
• Ten jackal every day, all year round
• Unlimited numbers of blesbok, impala, gemsbok, wildebeest, plains zebra, nyala, waterbuck, and warthog
• Furthermore, if you are a landowner and your property is fenced in, you do not need a licence to hunt (even protected species).
• These laws give landowners, the local public and tourists a clear message that the lives of primates, caracal and jackals are cheap, their contribution to biodiversity is irrelevant and persecuting them is acceptable.
• This attitude is perpetuated as many youths are encouraged to go on hunting parties (often before they are 16) and compete to shoot and kill as many of these animals as possible.
• In 2015, bow hunting was re-introduced; the legal ban on bow hunting (because of its barbaric cruelty) in Sec 29 of the Ordinance has simply been “suspended” without public input or debate.
• Offering the choice of using a bow and arrow which is easy to obtain and silently wounds its victim, is wrong. Hunters using this means of killing/injuring without the noise of a gunshot, are less likely to be discovered, and gives the opportunity for more people to hunt – with or without permission, on their own or other private land, on state land or other open spaces.
• Caracal, baboons and monkeys should be protected under Appendix 2 of CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) and yet a single landowner could in theory kill 712 baboons, 712 monkeys, 3650 caracal and 3650 jackal every year under the 2016 Hunting Notice by Cape Nature. Or if hunting on a landowner’s own enclosed property, unlimited numbers of any wild animal can be killed.
• There is little scientific data on populations of many of the abovementioned species in the Western Cape.
• The only primate populations which are officially monitored and protected are in the Cape Peninsula and even that is marred by self-interest, official killings which are not scientifically justified, and unofficial persecution by some members of the public.
• Vervet monkey populations appear to be declining and are unhealthy in the Western Cape. Vervet monkey populations are not monitored yet the damage done to these populations is clear to anyone living in areas where monkeys were frequently seen in the past. For example, Vervet monkey populations between Mossel Bay and Stormsriver are badly damaged, with residents reporting the disappearance of whole troops. It is no longer common to sight these animals and troops, and more often than not, the troops contain too few individuals (often under five). With fewer troops around, dispersing males have further to travel, at great risk, to find new troops to move into.
• The population numbers of many species such as baboons or monkeys tend to be overestimated as they are attracted to areas where there are humans. Humans supply easy energy through the “waste” they discard, and crops are tempting to the primate gatherers. There is competition for land which previously “belonged” to the wildlife.


“Power is of two kinds. One is obtained by the fear of punishment and the other by acts of love. Power based on love is a thousand times more effective and permanent then the one derived from fear of punishment.” – Mahatma Gandhi